Small Business Owner Weekly Review (Week of July 15, 2013)


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A Blog-to-Book Success: Catching Up with WordPresser-Turned-Bestseller Jared Gulian


Wow! It only proves that technology leads the way of the world.

The WordPress.com Blog

Last November, we chatted with New Zealand blogger Jared Gulian, who snagged a publishing contact for a book based on his WordPress.com blog, Moon Over Martinborough. His book of the same name, released last month, has climbed to #4 on New Zealand’s bestseller list for nonfiction. We caught up with Jared amid this exciting, eventful month and talked to him about his experience so far.

Moon Over Martinborough

Your book, Moon Over Martinborough, was released on June 7. What has the past month been like?

It’s been absolutely insane in the best possible way. It started out with a launch event in the Martinborough village, where I live. The turnout was amazing. Everyone was very excited about the book, since it features Martinborough and its people.

After the launch, it kept getting better. I’ve been surprised by the level of media interest across New Zealand, and I’ve had interviews with…

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Idiom ( Thesis)


Language Pulsations: Media Ideologies


Pulsations

(1) “Is this a good time for you?” I asked shortly after he answered the phone. “It’s fine,” he answered, “Though I normally keep phone calls short. For Skype calls I’ll have longer talks, but on the phone, I normally go for 10 or 12 minutes.” “Sounds good,” I responded, briefly wondering to myself, Does he not want to talk to me?

(2) I received an SMS on the bus to work: “I don’t see you as a friend anymore. Goodbye.” I called the writer of the message after work. “What’s the problem?” I asked him. “You didn’t answer my text yesterday.” I sighed. “I don’t answer texts when I’m busy. It’s nothing personal.”

(3) “He broke up with me in a Facebook message,” she sobbed, “Can you believe it?”

(4) An American college student, while backpacking through India, befriends an Indian guy whom he later adds as a Friend…

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http://incomepa…


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Blogging


http://incomepart.com/ref.php?page=act/ref&invcod=177353


Agree…Nowadays they say that the basis of success lies neither in dependence nor in independence but in interdependence.

The Daily Post

Remember that old saying that went something like, “Get new followers, but keep the old”? Okay, I may be stretching the truth a bit here, but one thing’s for sure: it’s always a joy to get new readers. Part of blogging is putting yourself out there to build relationships with those who come back to your site again and again.

As much as you love your current readership, it’s important to consistently draw in new visitors. Fortunately, social networking sites give us a plethora of tools from which we can choose to achieve this. Here are a few tips, for the total beginner to the seasoned pro, to help you make your social networking accounts work for you:

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An Introduction Sociolinguistics and its Importance in Language Learning


I want 2 speak Thai

Shannon KennedyShannon Kennedy’s blog, Eurolinguiste, is one of those diamonds that you find by accident, but are glad you did.  After I stumbled upon her blog, I followed and added it to my side bar of blogs I recommend you follow.  When I asked Shannon to write a guest post, she mentioned that her expertise was in sociolinguistics.  That sounded so interesting to me that I asked her to write about that.  Though the concept may sound very academic, it is a very practical concept that all of us language learners should apply.  So with out further ado, take it away Shannon:
When learning a new language, it is often only the language itself that is looked at and studied rather than the context in which the language belongs. Ultimately, if you are learning the language to use it, then the appropriate place(s) and culture(s) of the language should be taken into consideration in…

View original post 1,183 more words

An Introduction Sociolinguistics and its Importance in Language Learning


I want 2 speak Thai

Shannon KennedyShannon Kennedy’s blog, Eurolinguiste, is one of those diamonds that you find by accident, but are glad you did.  After I stumbled upon her blog, I followed and added it to my side bar of blogs I recommend you follow.  When I asked Shannon to write a guest post, she mentioned that her expertise was in sociolinguistics.  That sounded so interesting to me that I asked her to write about that.  Though the concept may sound very academic, it is a very practical concept that all of us language learners should apply.  So with out further ado, take it away Shannon:
When learning a new language, it is often only the language itself that is looked at and studied rather than the context in which the language belongs. Ultimately, if you are learning the language to use it, then the appropriate place(s) and culture(s) of the language should be taken into consideration in…

View original post 1,183 more words

MA course on letters at Leiden


Late Modern English letters

Next semester, an MA course will be taught at the University of Leiden called Letters as Sociohistorical-linguistic documents:

Sociolinguists want to get access to informal spoken language – an impossible aim for the historical sociolinguist. In this course we will look at the next-best option: the language of private, informal letters, and we will draw on these letters as an object of sociolinguistic analysis. The focus will be on the Late Modern English period (1700 – 1900), and on published and unpublished letters by famous and not-so-famous people, ranging from Jane Austen, Mrs Montagu and Robert Lowth to William and Elizabeth Clift. We will study handwriting, letter-writing conventions and the postal system; the spelling, vocabulary and grammar of the language of letters; and we will correlate our findings with sociolinguistic variables such as the writer’s social and regional origin, age, gender and education as well as social network…

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